Cocktail Recipes

A Little History

Cocktails and mixology date back as old as bars and pharmaceutical industries, it was the marriage of the two that changed it all. Modern day liquors and spirits such as sweet and dry vermouths, Chartreuse, Fernet Branca, really any and all digestifs and aperitifs originally started in the pharmaceutical industry. Bars were the place you could purchase spirits, beer, and sometimes wine and consume it. It was the perfect place to decompress after a longs days’ work, same sort of feeling as we have today after a long day. Sometimes we just need to relax and have a drink and what better place to do it than in a bar with friends. Then came prohibition. The alcoholics equivalent to the dark ages.

One beautiful irony about prohibition is that some of the very people – in addition to those 1920’s rebels – that successfully made alcohol illegal were some of the people secretly funding the speak easies and other secret drinking clubs that popped up all over major cities. Unfortunately, though there was a booze shortage, because it was illegal to make, purchase, import and export. So, people got creative and would make some insanely strong concoctions in their bathtubs at home, otherwise known as Moonshine. Which got its name because the distillers would run their booze into the cities and into speak easies by the light of the moon (it also led to the birth of NASCAR). So, Moonshine began to flood into these speak easies remedying the shortage, however, it wasn’t exactly easy to drink. It was harsh stuff. In fact, some people died from consuming it, because sometimes the booze wasn’t distilled correctly making it poisonous. Shine was made by a litany of different bases, from corn to rye to potatoes or beets, whatever the distiller could get their hands on. It was almost always clear because most moonshiners didn’t have the capacity (or the time) to age their chemistry projects in barrels, which would give it its color. They also sought to make the booze nice and strong, imagine unaged corn whisky with a proof as high as 190, that’s over double the average proof of modern day spirits. It was powerful enough to power cars. So naturally this made it rather difficult to consume by itself. This is where the creativity of the bartenders came into play to help soften the flavor and mask the strength of the bathtub elixir. They would utilize sugars, fresh citrus, and other lower proof spirits (like vermouth) to calm down the intensity. And thus, modern mixology (bartending) was born.

Below you will find some of these classics – with a little Drink Me to the Moon twist – that are still alive and well today, as well as some others that are staples of the cocktail world. Mix and drink responsibly! Cheers!

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The Classics

The Old Fashioned

  • 2 oz. Rye Whiskey
  • 1 oz. Brown Sugar Simple Syrup or sugar cube
  • 2 dashes aromatic bitters
  • 2 dashes orange bitters

Combine all ingredients into rocks glass. Give it a stir. Add ice. Garnish with an orange peel and cherry.

The Margarita

  • 2 oz 100% de Agave tequila
  • 1 oz lime juice
  • 1 oz orange liquor
  • dash of agave

Combine all ingredients into shaker. Give it a light shake. Then strain onto fresh ice. Garnish with a lime wheel.

The Manhattan

  • 2 oz of rye whiskey or bourbon
  • 1 oz of sweet vermouth
  • 3 dashes of bitters

Combine all ingredients into mixing glass. Stir for about 30 seconds or until contents are cold. Strain into a martini glass and serve with a cherry.

Vesper

  • 1 oz. Gin
  • 1 oz. Vodka
  • 1 oz. Lillet Blanc

Combine all ingredients into a mixing glass. Add ice. Give it a strong stir. Strain into a martini glass finish it with a twist of lemon.
Or do it the James Bond way and combine all the ingredients into a shaker tin. Shake. Then, finish the same as above.

The Aviation

  • 2 oz. Gin
  • 3/4 oz. Lemon Juice
  • 3/4 oz. Maraschino Cherry Liquor
  • 1/2 oz. Creme de Violette or Yvette

Combine all ingredients into shaker tin. Shake. Strain into a martini glass. Garnish with a cherry (or lemon twist).

Negroni

  • 1 1/2 oz. Gin
  • 3/4 oz. Campari
  • 3/4 oz. Sweet Vermoth

Combine all ingredients into mixing glass. Stir. Strain into a martini glass or rocks glass. Garnish with a twist of orange.

The Original Whiskey Sour

  • 2 oz. Rye Whiskey or Bourbon
  • 1 oz. Lime or Lemon Juice (both work)
  • 1 oz. Simple Syrup or Brown Sugar Simple
  • 1 Egg

Crack egg and put ONLY THE EGG WHITES into the shaker tin. Combine the rest of the ingredients into the tin. Shake hard, for at least 20-30 seconds to ensure the frothy egg white. Strain into a martini glass. Dash some bitters on top. Garnish with a cherry or lemon twist.

Gin Fizz

  • 1 1/2 oz. Gin
  • 1 oz. Orange Liquor
  • 3/4 oz. Lemon Juice
  • 3/4 oz. Honey
  • 1 Egg

Crack egg and put ONLY THE EGG WHITES into the shaker tin. Combine the rest of the ingredients into the tin. Shake hard, for at least 20-30 seconds to ensure the frothy egg white. Strain onto fresh ice in a tall glass. Garnish with a twist of orange and a dash of bitters.

The Penicillin

  • 2 oz. Scotch Whiskey
  • 1 oz. Lemon Juice
  • 1 oz. Simple Syrup or Brown Sugar Simple

Combine all ingredients into shaker tin. Shake. Strain into a martini glass. Dash some bitters on top. Garnish with a twist of lemon.

** Disclaimer: The recipes above are our versions of some classics, recipes that have been played with and experimented in real world. You will find different recipes for these cocktails other places, much like you will find different recipes for cooking the same dish. To get a better understanding, check out [insert mixology article].**

Questions on the cocktails and what you may need? Drop us a line!